War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0362 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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being just one month, and find whole number of prescriptions 265 - for prisoners 103, for garrison 162; number in fort, including the prisoners, 236 - garrison 206, prisoners 30. You will see the proportion of sickness is almost five times greater among the prisoners than among the troops and I can give no other cause than miserable quarters, as all have the same food. Any instructions from you will be gladly received and all orders promptly obeyed.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. H. PEASE,

Tenth Connecticut Vols., Asst. Surg. Hammond General Hospital.

[First indorsement.]

MEDICAL DIRECTOR'S OFFICE,

EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS.

Respectfully referred to Lieutenant-Colonel Hoffman, with a request that the prisoners of Fort Macon be provided with other and suitable quarters, to be approved of by the surgeon in charge.

F. G. SNELLING,

Medical Director Eighteenth Army Corps.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

New Berne, N. C., April 20, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded to the commanding officer of Fort Macon for his attention and action. The health of the prisoners should of course be attended to.

By order of General Foster:

S. HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS COMMANDANT OF PRISONS,

Camp Chase, Ohio, March 18, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Owing to the large influx of rebel prisoners and paroled soldiers our camp is full. We have now here 1,008 rebel prisoners, 3,000 paroled soldiers, 8 companies of the Second Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, part of 2 batteries and some detachments of recruits, 30 recruits, 30 deserters. I also understand that at Louisville are a number of rebel prisoners (700) that will be ordered here as soon as room can be had for them. In view of these facts I take the liberty of asking if the fence now around Prison Numbers 3 can be removed and inclose a piece of ground on the south end of Prison Numbers 2 large enough to hold 2,000 prisoners. This would place the prisons all together and give us quarters for 1,000 more paroled soldiers. Prison Numbers 3 being situated in the middle of the camp the sewerage from it has to pass through two regimental quarters on the east and the stench arising from the drains make it not only unhealthy but very unpleasant for those quarters below. Our prevailing winds in hot weather are from the west and southwest and if the prisoners were all at the east end of camp where Prisons Nos. 1 and 2 are the drainage would all be from the camp and no smell from privies would annoy our soldiers. My plan would be to inclose with good substantial fence, same as Prisons 1 and 2, the ground necessary to hold what rebel prisoners will probably be sent here more than Prisons