War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0281 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION.

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paroles? I would like also if possible the authority for the arrest and the time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 17, 1863.

Captain E. L. WEBBER,

Commanding Camp Chase Prison, Columbus, Ohio.

CAPTAIN: Your letter of the 11th instant is received.

General Orders, Nos. 60 and 90, of 1862, are still in force and all medical officers and chaplains received among the prisoners of war should be discharged and sent beyond our lines.

Send them on their parole to report to General Wright at Cincinnati and write a letter to the general requesting him to forward them by such points in our lines as he may deem proper.

None can be recognized as holding the place of a medical officer or chaplain but those who are so designated on the rolls.

I am not yet prepared to say that "contract surgeons" can be classed with medical officers.

It will be determined in a few days whether rebel officers can be permitted to take the oath of allegiance.

You are not at liberty to grant paroles to rebel officers under any circumstances without the authority of the Secretary of War except in case of illness which is provided for by the circular of regulations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 18, 1863.

Brigadier General JACOB AMMEN,

Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

GENERAL: Pursuant to instructions from the General-in-Chief you are authorized to release all prisoners of war belonging to the Confederate Army not officers on their taking the oath of allegiance in good faith. A careful examination will be made in each case to ascertain the sincerity of the applicant, and it will be explained that by taking the oath of allegiance he becomes liable to be called on for military service as any other loyal citizen. Whenever there is a doubt the application must be rejected. The oath will be taken in duplicate, one copy for the person to whom it is administered and one with roll of all so discharged to be sent to this office. This permission does not extend to guerrillas or other irregular organizations. None of these will be released except on special report in each case, approved at this office. The above instructions will cover the several applications made by individuals to be released on taking the oath of allegiance.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Same to commandants of all other important prison posts.)