War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0273 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION.

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that I do not apprehend any difficulty but that the accommodations could be furnished.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. E. DOSTER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Provost-Marshal.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA,

Mesilla, February 15, 1863.

Captain BENJAMIN C. CUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Santa Fe.

CAPTAIN: I learn from two parties who have recently arrived here from San Antonio, Tex., that there are in that vicinity 300 prisoners, enlisted men of the U. S. service, treated like felons and miserably fed and clothed. My informants say that they are a part of the old regular force who were taken prisoners when General Twiggs turned over to the Texas commissioners. Cannot something be done from here for their exchange?

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. C. S. FORCES N. E. ARKANSAS AND S. E. MISSOURI,

Near Batesville, Ark., February 15, 1863.

Brigadier-General DAVIDSON, U. S. Army,

Commanding U. S. Forces, West Plains, Mo.

GENERAL: After the action at Hartville, Mo., I left my wounded in charge of several surgeons, some of whom have returned to my camp paroled stating that surgeons, attendants and wounded had been paroled by U. S. officers.

There was an agreement made between General Hindman, C. S. Army, and General Blunt, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Frontier, forbidding this act, which has been honestly and faithfully carried out by the U. S. authorities. The conduct of the U. S. officers at Hartville is in direct violation of it.

Again: It has not been the usage of either the United States or Confederate States Government in this war to parole the surgeons.

I hope and believe that when this letter reaches you justice will be done my Government with regard to the surgeons, attendants and wounded left at Hartville.

I must also call your attention to the fact that in the little dash made by a detachment of your cavalry into Botesville the officer in command carried off some twenty-five miles the only attendant of a wounded soldier and paroled him.

This act was unofficer like, cruel and inhuman, for the poor soldier was unable to move and as far as that officer was concerned was left to die.

I cannot, do not, believe that you will countenance such an act.

Very respectfully,

J. S. MARMADUKE,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

18 R R--SERIES II, VOL V