War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0272 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, February 14, 1863.

Major General H. G. WRIGHT,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant informing me of your action in the matter of furnishing necessary supplies for the prisoners of war at Camp Butler and I am much indebted to you for your considerate attention.

Captain Freedley is quite conversant with the manner in which prisoners of war have heretofore been provided for and it was for this reason that I directed him to confer with you in relation to them, expecting that he would then visit the different camps and see that the regulations heretofore issued were properly enforced. Finding that he was delayed at Indianapolis I ordered him to visit Camp Butler and Camp Douglas to inspect and report on the condition of the prisoners.

The prisoners' fund if well managed would cover a large part of the expenses necessary to provide for their indispensable wants.

We must furnish them blankets for the time we have them and more or less clothing, but of course this should be limited to what is absolutely requisite.

Please find inclosed a copy of the regulations providing for the control of prisoners.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

WASHINGTON, February 14, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel F. A. DICK, Provost Marshal-General:

Select at Saint Louis and Alton Prisons and send under a suitable guard to report to the provost-marshal in this city for exchange 350 citizen prisoners. Include guerrillas and those under charges or sentenced to confinement for the war or a less period, not spies. Send them by Pittsburgh and report by telegram when they will leave.

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 14, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. E. DOSTER, Provost-Marshal, Washington.

COLONEL: Can you provide for 500 citizen prisoners for a few days? They may be expected from the West in ten days.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., February 14, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: In reply to your inquiry as to whether provision could be made for 500 citizen prisoners for a few days I have the honor to state