War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0248 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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captured by the Army of the United States have been granted paroles since the proclamation of Jefferson Davis refusing paroles or exchange to the captured officers of Union regiments. "

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C., February 2, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I inclose herewith a resolution of the House of Representatives dated January 30, probably through inadvertence directed to me.

In answer to this resolution I have the honor to report to the War Department that immediately on receiving official information that the enemy had retained our officers who were taken prisoners of war, in violation of the cartel, the following order was telegraphed to all commanders of military departments and of armies in the field:

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 30, 1862.

No officers, prisoners of war, will be released on parole till further orders.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

I have no information that any rebel officers captured by the Union forces has been released on parole since that time. Medical officers are made an exception to the order, it being understood that in resect to them the enemy continues to observe the stipulations of the cartel.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 6, 1863.

Major General S. R. CURTIS, Saint Louis, Mo.

GENERAL: I beg leave to call your attention to the inclosed slip* of newspapers which purports to give the substance of a recent order of General Loan. Such an order if it be genuine is in violation of the laws of war and may lead to serious difficulties. It was to prevent such excesses that the law of July last was passed requiring sentences of death to first receive the approval of the President before execution.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 6, 1863.

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant and beg leave to offer the following reply: It would doubtless be the shortest and possibly the cheapest route for prisoners of war from Louisville to Baltimore to take the steam-boat to Parkersburg and thence by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Baltimore, but it would be hazardous to take them through the disaffected

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*Not found.

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