War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0243 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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close confinement certain Federal officers in retaliation for the confinement at Fort Pickens of Judge Wright, Mr. George W. Wright and Mr. Merritt, citizens of Pensacola. I inclose herewith copy of Orders, Numbers 14, from these headquarters, in conformity with which and letters those gentlemen have been liberated. Judge Wright is at present in Pensacola, Mr. George W. Wright has passed out of our lines and Mr. Merritt has left this place for New Orleans.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ISAAC DYER,

Colonel, Commanding District of Pensacola.

[Sub-inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF PENSACOLA, Numbers 14.

January 19, 1863.

The commanding officer at Fort Pickens will release from confinement G. W. Wright on condition of his giving his parole of honor.

By command of Brigadier-General Dow:

OLIVER MATHEWS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General and Aide-de-Camp.

CAMP BUTLER, ILL., February 5, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN:

About one-half the rebel prisoners confined here are foreigners, conscripts. They are anxious to take the oath of allegiance. I am satisfied of their truthfulness. Shall I administer it to them and discharge? Rolls will be sent you to-morrow.

W. F. LYNCH,

Colonel Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, February 5, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I inclose to you a copy of letter sent a few days since to Major-General Hitchcock. This morning I received from him a telegram stating that orders will be issued as desired by me. I have just received a communication from Mr. Ould in which in reply to me he expresses a willingness to exchange all citizens prisoners. I wish therefore that the orders asked for in my letter to General Hitchcock may be immediately executed and that all citizen prisoners be forwarded from their various places of detention to Washington as speedily as possible. Please inform me on what day they will be ready and I will send a steamer from here under charge of a discreet officer to bring them down. Mr. Ould states that he will have our prisoners ready. I urge prompt action on this subject as all such exchange arrangements are liable to be interrupted and it would be a source of general regret if such interruption should now occur. How many citizen prisoners are now in the Old Capitol Prison? Will you please show this letter to the Secretary of War and to Major-General Hitchcock?

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.