War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0227 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, January 30, 1863.

Brigadier General M. R. PATRICK,

Provost-Marshal-General, Army of the Potomac:

A dispatch is just received from commanding officer Fort Delaware reporting Captain Robert W. Baylor confined there charged with murder of one of our men while bearing a flag of truce.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 30, 1863.

Major General W. G. WRIGHT,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio.

GENERAL: In reply to your reference of the letter of Lieutenant Colonel D. B. Wright, of the Confederate Army, to this office I have the honor to say that the order directing that rebel officers shall not be paroled does not apply to cases where the officers have already been exchanged as appears to be the position of Colonel Wright. The battle of Perryville took place on the 7th of October and all officers captured then or previous to the 10th December, 1862, are declared by General Orders, Numbers 10, to be exchange, and all such should be sent through our lines by the nearest suitable route. The cartel does not require that prisoners shall be paroled within ten days but that they 'shall be sent with all reasonable dispatch" to the two points designated for exchange or parole.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 30, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. E. DOSTER,

Provost-Marshal, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: Can you give me any information in relation to Captain Daniel Dusky and Lieutenant Jacob Varner, commissioned officers belonging to the rebel army of Virginia, said to be held in confinement at hard labor in the penitentiary of this city? Officers of our army are held in the penitentiary at Richmond in retaliation asked for that such steps may be taken as the case demands. Please reply at your earliest convenience.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., January 30, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: I have made a thorough inspection of Camp Morton to-day. I find it much dilapidated and sadly in need of repairs. The buildings already there can be made to accommodate about 2,000