War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0204 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

Notify him of the number sent to each place. If General Rosecrans has not sent wounded prisoners to Camp Butler substitute it for Camp Morton.

By order of General-in-Chief:

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, January 23, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington City.

COLONEL: The letter of Colonel B. L. E. Bonneville, commanding Benton Barracks, Mo., relating to civilians employed by the Government captured and paroled by the enemy referred by you to this office on the 14th instant is herewith returned. Civilians employed by the Quartermaster's Department captured by the enemy are considered as entitled to pay until released. They should if on parole be discharged from the service on reaching the first convenient place and are entitled to receive certificates of the material facts to enable them to establish their claim for pay until released. Those who have been exchanged can generally obtain employment from the quartermaster upon making their cases known. If they do not choose to re-enter the service or if not being exchanged their paroles prevent them serving the United States there is no other course left but to discharge them. The United States cannot support them in idleness. It is not considered proper to allow them transportation to return to their homes or distant places of employment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

COLUMBUS, January 23, 1863.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

We can accommodate from 300 to 400 wounded prisoners. Prison Numbers 3 requires repairing, which has been ordered.

JAMES COOPER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, January 23, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel LUDLOW, Agent for Exchange of Prisoners:

Does the phrase "all captures on the sea" in the declaration of exchanges cover citizens running the blockade?

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

FORT MONROE, January 23, 1863.

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

We have three Confederate officers confined at Fort Norfolk. Shall they be paroled and sent to Richmond to be exchanged for specific equivalents of our officers confined there or return in ten days?

WM. H. LUDLOW,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Agent for Exchange of Prisoners.