War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0176 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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they are ready to march. Fragments of companies no heretofore mustered will be mustered for pay to 31st December.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Copies to Colonel B. L. E. Bonneville, commanding Benton Barracks, Saint Louis, Mo. ; Brigadier General J. Ammen, commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.)

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 13, 1863.

General J. H. MARTINDALE,

Military Governor of Washington.

GENERAL: In reply to the matter of transportations for the deserters from the rebel army referred by you to the Secretary of War I have the honor to say that as these men have been recognized as deserters and have been set at liberty they are placed on the same footing with other citizens and must provide for their own necessities by their labor.

By order of the Secretary of War:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 13, 1863.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

COLONEL: All the paroles troops in the West captured previous to the 10th December are embraced in the recent exchanges, and I respectfully request that they be assembled and prepared for the field at Camp Chase, Camp Douglas and Benton Barracks and that they be there mustered and paid before marching.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Post Arkansas, January 14, 1863.

Major General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Department of the Tennessee.

GENERAL: I have all the prisoners embarked for Saint Louis, Mo. My reasons for sending them are these: First, I have received no orders to exchange them; second, the headquarters of the commissioner for the exchange of prisoners is there; third, it would seem to me criminal to send the prisoners to Vicksburg if they may be properly sent elsewhere. The send them there would be to re-enforce a place with several thousand prisoners at the moment we are trying to reduce it. I would sail from here to Little Rock and reduce that place but for want of sufficient water in the channel of the Arkansas River. This being the case I will proceed as soon as I have completed the demolition of the enemy's work here to Napoleon, by which time I hope to hear from you.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.