War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0164 PRISONER OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 8, 1863.

Colonel W. H. LYTLE, Tenth Ohio Infantry, Cincinnati, Ohio.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 5th instant is just received, and in reply I would state that to guard against the possibility of your name not being on the rolls for exchange I have written to Colonel Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners, to call his particular attention to your case which I hope will result in your speedy exchange.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 8, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. LUDLOW,

Agent for Exchange of Prisoners, Fort Monroe, Va.

COLONEL: I have just received a note from Colonel W. H. Lytle, Tenth Ohio Infantry, expressing great anxiety to be exchanged, and fearing that his name may not be on the rolls I call your attention to his case and I beg that you will not lose sight of it should the exchange of any officers [be] acted upon. He was captured at Perryville.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., January 8, 1863.

Asst. Surg. N. A. HURSAM,

Twentieth Maine Volunteers, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I am informed by Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners, that it is understood between him and R. Ould, esq., agent for exchange on the part of the Confederate service, that all paroles exacted of medical officers in either army by subordinate commanders are null and void; the parole exacted of you by Major Fairfax, of the Confederate Army is therefore not finding and you will proceed to join your regiment without delay.

By order of the General-in-Chief:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

MADISON, WIS., January 9, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

In the matter of habeas corpus of the Ozaukee County prisoners arrested and held in custody for resisting the draft the supreme court will make a decision on the 12th instant. Should they decide that the President has not the power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus or to punish by court-martial persons forcibly resisting the draft and should issue and attachment in order to enforce their decision shall I release the prisoners? If not released in such a case there may be