War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0121 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY- GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., December 24, 1862.

Major General S. R. CURTIS,

Commanding Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of letters from Brigadier-General Loan and others in relation to the exchange of Lexington, Mo., prisoners, referred by you to this office. My letter of the 18th instant will have advised you of the steps already taken to secure the exchange of these prisoners. In the meantime it of course will not be proper for officers or soldiers who were paroled at that time to enter upon active service, nor would it be advisable to discharge any of these men while waiting for this exchange, which there is little doubt will be effected within two or three weeks.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary- General of Prisoners.

OFFICE PROVOST- MARSHAL- GENERAL.

Wheeling, December 24, 1862.

Colonel W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-0 General of Prisoners.

SIR: I have the honor specially to report the receipt of a prisoner of war sent here by Brigadier-General Crook in the shape of a female wearing male apparel charged as a spy for the rebels, arrested in the streets of Charleston, V. a. Her statements are contradictory, at one time asserting she was in the rebel army, at another time affirming she served with the Twenty- third Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, U. S . Army. She is a coarse- looking creature, scarcely answering the description of la fille du regiment. I have placed her in the Ohio County jail for the present, ordered clothes for her sex, and await your order regarding her.

Very respectfully,

JOS. DARR, JR.,

Major and Provost- Marshal- General.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to Colonel Doster, provost- marshall, to know if he can provide for the within-named woman in the Old Capitol Prison if she is ordered to this city. Please return this letter.

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary- General of Prisoners.

[Inclosure.]

A FEMALE SOLDIER IN CUSTODY- AN EVENTFUL CAREER.

Among the prisoners brought up yesterday on the steamer Bostona, Numbers 2, was the some what famous female soldier, Harry Fitzallen, of whom our readers have doubtless heard something through the Cincinnati papers. Harry, who was dressed in a tightly- fitting cavalry uniform, was taken to jail yesterday soon after his arrival, when the provost- marshal, Major Darr, with a view of ascertaining if possible the truth in relation to the charge that has ben made against Harry of being a rebel spy, held an interview with her. During the conversation she said her name was Marian McKenzie. She was born in Glasgow, Scotland. Her mother died when she was an infant and her father removed