War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0091 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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of sutlers who are or have been held as prisoners at Richmond and elsewhere I have the honor to report that the cartel of September 25, current year, requires that "captured sutlers, teamsters and all civilians in the actual service of either party shall be exchanged for prisoners in similar positions. "

In conformity with this requirement a number of exchanges have already been made, and lists or rolls are now in course of preparation in the office of the commissary-general of prisoners embracing the names of sutlers and sutler's clerks, with a view top their exchange, which will be perfected as soon as possible, and no time will be lost in effecting the exchange. The rolls now in preparation will embrace all classes of citizens referred to in the cartel.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. HITCHCOCK,

Major-General of Vols., Commissioner for Exchange of Prisoners.

FORT MONROE, December 17, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

There is no reason here why the women and children to go to City Point should not go now. They should, however, be sent in a transport which can proceed there without trans-shipment here. There are some women and children at Norfolk desirous of going not to return, and I ask your authority to send them. I send 550 prisoners of war to-day. I think it important that Colonel Ludlow should see you and I will send him by the Baltimore boat this evening.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Nashville, December 17, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 15th instant.

On reference to article 7, the first of the supplementary articles of the cartel, you will find that a mutual agreement between the commanders of either army is necessary to authorize the exchange of prisoners at any other than the two points designated in the article. By the course pursued by you I was compelled to receive the Hartsville prisoners. However, I merely state this in explanation of my letter without intending further to dwell on the point. But I cannot accept your statement that we have inaugurated the practice of stripping prisoners of their overcoats and blankets. I cannot even admit that it is a practice with us; on the contrary I know that we have furnished blankets and overcoats to your soldiers and we shall continue to do so.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Nashville, December 17, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG.

GENERAL: I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your communication announcing the release of three of my men unlawfully captured behind a flag of truce.