War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0073 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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between Major-General Butler and the French Admiral, Mr. Reynaud, relative to the imprisonment of the Messrs. Le More, alleged French subjects residing at New Orleans.

Replying thereto I am directed to inform you that a copy of your letter has been transmitted to General Butler with instructions to remit the punishment of the ball and chain and hard labor.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 12, 1862.

Major General B. F. BUTLER, Commanding, &c., New Orleans, La.

SIR: The Secretary of War instructs me to transmit a copy of a letter from the State Department relative to your order for the imprisonment of the Messrs. Le More, and especially in reference to the case of Alfred Le More, confined at Fort Pickens, and additionally punished with the attachment of a ball and chain to his leg. The Secretary also directs me to say that under the instructions of the President mentioned in the communication of the Secretary of State the prisoner must be released from the ball and chain and from hard labor.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, January 26, 1862.

The commanding officer of the District of Pensacola will carry out the within orders of the War Department and communicate his action to these headquarters returning these papers.

By command of Major-General Banks:

RICHARD B. IRWIN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

Received back February 13, 1863, and respectfully referred to the Board of Prison Inspectors to ascertain and report where Mr. Le More now is.

By command:

RICHARD B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C., December 12, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel F. A. DICK,

Provost-Marshal-General, Saint Louis, Mo.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 6th instant is received and in reply I can give you only general instructions in relation to the discipline of the prisons. To insure good order, good police and healthy condition of the prison regularity and system must be introduced into the management of every department, and the manner of accomplishing this I must leave to you own judgment. A through policing of every part of the prison should take place very morning, and a through and frequent airing of clothing should be required when practicable.