War of the Rebellion: Serial 118 Page 0054 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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The court does not sit till April, 1862.

I would respectfully suggest that as the case is presented by Colonel Dick there can be little doubt that he should be recognized as a colonel in the rebel army, and there is no room for question that the rebels should receive him in exchange for a colonel of our army.

The second question is a legal one and it is not proper that I should suggest a reply if I could.

Colonel Dick ha sin his possession prisoners of war against whom indictments have been found in the U. S. court. They have been demanded of him by the U. S. marshal and he desires to be instructed as to the course which he should pursue. By the cartel these men can claim to be sent to Vicksburg and paroled or exchanged.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C., December 9, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel DOSTER,

Provost-Marshal, Washington City.

COLONEL: At the instance of Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners, I have the honor to request hat Henry A. Ball, reported to be held as a spy in this city, may be released upon parole to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow, at Fort Monroe, Va. It is demanded under the cartel.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

WASHINGTON, December 9, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel F. A. DICK, Provost-Marshal-General:

Release no more prisoners of war on their taking the oath of allegiance. Will answer your letter of 3rd instant by mail.

W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C., December 9, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. LUDLOW,

Agent for Exchange of Prisoners, Fort Monroe, Va.

COLONEL: I inclose herewith a number of applications for exchange together with some original rolls.

Many Union men from border States are held in a most shameful condition in the rebel prisons, and I am sure you will spare no efforts to secure their speedy parole and exchange. The names I send to you send you a more complete roll in a few days from Major Wood, superintendent of the Old Capitol Prison.

I have again telegraphed to General Grant for rolls of captures made by Rosecrans and have asked that a duplicate set be sent. It is probable they have gone to Vicksburg and will be forwarded from thence