War of the Rebellion: Serial 117 Page 0928 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATES, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

Copies of all orders, letters, telegrams sent and received to be kept. Open all telegrams directed to me and advise me if necessary.

LLOYD TILGHMAN,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

HOLLY SPRINGS, October 26, 1862.

General PEMBERTON:

Will the 2,700 prisoners sent from Guntown to Meridian do for the retained 2,000 you wrote about, their exchange not being completed?

EARL VAN DORN.

HEADQUARTERS EXCHANGED PRISONERS,

Jackson, Miss., October 26, 1862.

Major J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAJOR: I have learned from prisoners arriving here that General Van Dorn has ordered the prisoners paroled by the Federal authorities at Bolivar and returned thence to Holly Springs to remain at that place quartered with their regiments. If it is desired that these prisoners shall report to me it will be necessary for General Pemberton to issue an order requiring it. The prisoners at Holly Springs so far as I can learn are not accounted for at these headquarters and we can obtain a list of them only by their reporting.

Respectfully,

JOHN GREGG,

Brigadier-General, Provisional Army, C. S.

GENERAL ORDERS, Numbers 25.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF HENRICO, Prison Series.

Richmond, October 27, 1862.

Captain T. P. Turner will assume command of the C. S. prisons. Captain G. W. Alexander is hereby relieved.

By order of General Winder:

W. S. WINDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OXFORD, MISS., October 27, 1862.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

DEAR SIR: We, the undersigned, would respectfully represent to you that on Saturday evening, 18th instant, we with four other gentlemen of our vicinity were arrestee by the Federal authorities at Jackson, Tenn., and are now held as hostages, for four Union men arrested by some independent partisans, who were brought by those partisans and are now held in confinement at Holly Springs, Miss.

These four Unionists are men of no standing in our community-ignorant and move in the lowest circle, incapable of doing good to any cause they may espouse, further than giving information to the enemy. We, who are held as hostages for their safety, represent wealth and influence and will be ruined by the Federal officials if these four men are not released. We would further represent to you that we who are held as hostages are Southern men, capable of giving material aid to the Southern en, capable of giving material aid to the Southern Army should it ever reach our locality, a thing we devoutly desire. These are facts we can attest by the right sort of men, and we