War of the Rebellion: Serial 117 Page 0922 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATES, ETC.

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refused to recommend their acceptance and we withdrew from the regiment. I came within your lines and had been residing as a citizen at Dresden, Tenn., for some six weeks when I was made a prisoner by Colonel Jackson, Tennessee cavalry. I stated the circumstances to him and he immediately released me on parole. I was ordered to report at Jackson, Miss., and Colonel Jackson promised to lay my case before the proper authorities. However, before I heard from him I was sent to Montgomery, Ala., and confined with the other Federal prisoners and subsequently removed to this place. I presume the prisoners here will be exchanged soon. I do not wish an exchange and shall never serve again in the Federal Army. What I wish is to be permitted to parole, and I will pledge myself to do all I can for the cause of the South not opposed to the interests of Missouri.

Yours, &c.,

CLAY CRAWFORD,

Captain, Missouri State Troops.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, October 17, 1862.

Honorable THOMAS A. R. NELSON, Jonesborough, Tenn.

DEAR SIR: I regret to say that some persons incapable it seems of appreciating the manly and patriotic motives which prompted your address to the people of East Tennessee have attributed it to a desire to procure thereby the release of your son. It is due to you that I should state that neither you nor any one ever intimated to me that you desired the release of your son, nor did I intimate any promise or intention of releasing him. I took it for granted that you did desire it, but I had too just an appreciation of your character to suppose for one moment that your action on so important a matter would be influenced by that motive. I have heard that your son was young and indiscreet and had committed the offense for which he was arrested in violation of your expressed wishes and whilst you were absent from home. I have released a number of prisoners besides your son, and I released him because I supposed it would be more gratifying to you and because I judged that the boy would be more likely to become a more loyal and useful citizen if brought within your influence than if left in prison with persons older and more culpable than himself. If you think the insinuations against your motives worthy of notice you are at liberty to make such use of this note as you may think proper.

Very respectfully and truly,

SAML. JONES,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, October 17, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond, Va.:

There are numbers of our paroled prisoners here, and [more] are coming daily. Can you not send an officer here to arrange their exchange?

SAML. JONES,

Major-General, Commanding.