War of the Rebellion: Serial 117 Page 0072 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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free from dampness and are well ventilated. The quarters of the men comprise twenty buildings of the same interior divisions, number of rooms and dimensions as those barracks described as being at Camp Rathbun. They are designed for 100 men each, though with additional bunks for 50 men in each and a different arrangement of them from the present they will readily accommodate 150 men each. The quarters are all provided with bunks for 100 men each, but have no ticks for straw. There are two guard-houses, 34 by 17 feet each, and of one room each, with no cells or prison room. To the left and rear of the men's quarters is a building 100 by 20 feet, of 6 rooms, used as quarters for the field and staff. In their rear is the building containing the mess hall and kitchen under one roof. The mess hall is 130 by 40 feet and is well provided with benches and tables. It will seat 1,000 men by placing them closely. The kitchen is 50 by 40 feet and is amply furnished with all the materials and steam-boilers and furnaces, ranges, &c., for cooking for 1,000 men at a time and if necessary by increasing the furniture for 2,000. There is no bake-house and the same arrangement is made for supplying the food by contract as at Camp Rathbun and at the same price, the food being placed on the table cooked and the table furniture supplied. The sinks are quite insufficient, filthy and in bad order. This camp will accommodate by a different arrangement of its quarters and additional bunks, as suggested for Camp Rathbun, 3,000 men, though designed for the reception of 2,000. Accompanying this description is a ground plan of the buildings with reference marks.

Camp Numbers 4, at Elmira: This camp is known as Camp Robinson Barracks* and with the others at this point is in charge of Colonel E. F. Shepard, of the volunteers. It is easily accessible from the town, being located near a fine road, about one mile and a half from it in a southwest direction, on a plot of ground quite level, of a rectangular shape, of about 400 by 360 yards. The soil is firm and hard at all times; is composed of gravel covered with sward. It contains no troops at present. The situation is quite as high as the surrounding country and there is not in its vicinity either marsh, standing water or forest, or any locus of malaria or disease. The camp is abundantly supplied with fine, pure water from never-failing wells on the ground. On the west side is a low fence 4 1/2 feet in height, built of board slats nailed to posts, the slats placed horizontally. On the other three sides the public road limits the boundaries of the camp. The buildings were all built by the Government and both they and the grounds are exclusively under its control. They are all new, of one story, of wooden frames, with rough board coverings both for the sides and roofs, similarly arranged to those described at the other camps. The roofs are pitched and at the ridge pole are about 15 feet in height and at the eaves 8 feet. They all have firm floors of planks and are well ventilated. The quarters of the men comprise twenty buildings of the same interior divisions, number of rooms and dimensions as the barracks described as being at Camp Rathbun. They are designed for 100 men each, though with additional bunks for 50 men in each and a different arrangement of them from the present they will readily accommodate 150 men each. The quarters are all provided with bunks for 100 men each but have no ticks for straw. There are two guard-houses, 40 by 20 feet each, one of 3 equal rooms and the other of 1 large room and 3 cells of 6 feet square each. To the left and rear of the men's quarters is a building 100 by 20 feet, of 6 rooms, used as the quarters of the field and staff. In their rear

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*See p. 75.

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