War of the Rebellion: Serial 117 Page 0059 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --UNION.

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In conclusion I would remark even if it would be proper to notice Randolph's proposition, which under the circumstances I very much doubt, would it be wise at this moment to make a general exchange of prisoners of war when we have so many more of theirs than they have of ours, especially as Jefferson Davis has not always regarded paroles of honor?

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 24, 1862.

Major-General WOOL, Baltimore:

Send Major Cosby to Fort Delaware and also Captain Sheliha. I understand his parole was for the special purpose of effecting an exchange, and that failing by the act of those whom he recognizes as his superiors his claim to benefit of parole is inadmissible.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Numbers 118.

Memphis, Tenn., June 24, 1862.

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XI. It having been reported to the general commanding that a Major Polk, of the Confederate Army, is on parole and is permitted to roam at large in the city the provost-marshal of the city of Memphis will immediately arrest and confine said Polk and report to these headquarters by whom he has been paroled and by whose authority he is permitted to have the liberty of the city.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAINT LOUIS, June 24, 1862.

Colonel BOYD, Rolla, Mo.:

Tell Major Tompkins I shall hold him strictly responsible for any shooting not authorized by my orders. He is not authorized to shoot men not in arms.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, Mo., June 24, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN,

Commanding Central Division of Missouri, Jefferson City.

GENERAL: I have just received your letter of yesterday regarding prisoners. I think it useless to attempt to try all the prisoners captured and who are technically guilty of violation of the laws of war. As you remark the number is far too great to admit of it and very few of them will receive at the hands of a commission any more severe punishment than imprisonment during the war. This can be done as well and as properly in most cases without a trial as with. I do not think it worth while to bring before a commission any cases except