War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0702 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

in his favor is entirely conv invincing. It is desirable, so far as possible, that the Confederate and the State authorities should in similar cases be guided by like principle of action in this regard.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Richmond, August 9, 1861.

His Excellency Governor H. T. CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.

SIR: The constant arrival of additional prisoners of war in this city renders it necessary that provision shall at once be made for the accommodation of a portion of them elsewhere. You are therefore respectfully requested to hasten the preparations necessary for the Confederate prison at Salisbury to the extent of your ability, and to cause this Department to be informed at the earliest day when it may be ready for occupation.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, N. C., August 9, 1861.

H. T. PAIR, Esq.

DEAR SIR: I have just received a letter from a friend of mine in New York, Mr. Thomas A. DeMill, who is a Southern man, having moved from here fourteen years since, and has ever since last November as well as before been doing all he could to aid our cause and is now preparing to move back South. He writes in behalf of a Colonel Wood, of the Fourteenth [Brooklyn] New York Regiment, who was wounded at the battle of Bull Run and taken prisoner, and from my knowledge of Mr. DeMill's devotion to the Southern cause I am sure he would not take the pains to write thus if he were not sure that Colonel Wood was worthy of favorable consideration. He says:

I write to enlist your influence in his behalf, to have good care taken of him by our Southern people and if possible released on parole. He is a fine man and it would do good to your cause to have particular attention paid to him (even by the ladies). His wife has gone out to him with a friend of ours, Mr. Angus. Colonel Wood is a particular friend of ours, an influential man and popular with the public and from having been a militiaman for years was drawn into the popular current when our people were run mad. His heart was not in the cause and he was drawn where he did not wish to go, being compelled as a military man to yield to the current or be branded a coward. If you can do anything for him do so at once and it will benefit your cause ultimately. Let him have particular attention for he deserves it. I would not speak thus for any other of the many acquaintances I have in the Federal Army.

If Colonel Wood is in richmond a prisoner will you please seek him out and use your influence to mitigate his condition as much as propriety will permit? The Mr. Angus who has gone out with Mrs. Wood I saw in New York in June last and know that he openly espoused our cause warmly, at the risk of being mobbed and furnished with a coat of tar and feathers. I commend him to the kindest treatment from your citizens and if you see him give him mthanks for his efforts in our behalf. I address myself to you in this cause from having seen while in your office evidences of your taking an active part in endeavoring to alleviate the sufferings of humanity, and am,

Very respectfully, yours,

JAB. E. HOYT.