War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0657 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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To prevent the necessity of flags of truce containing threats to me hereafter allow me to add that in no degree will they change the course either of punishment or justice which my judgment may determine.

I have failed to find any other thing in your note which requires reply.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

BUELL'S HEADQUARTERS, June 6, 1862,

General HALLECK:

Fifteen hundred paroled prisoners, all private soldiers of Prentiss' command, have arrived at Nashville. What shall be done with them? They should be removed from there immediately as there are no troops to keep them in order.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

FORT HENRY, June 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

A number of citizens of Paris who have been very active secessionists can be arrested. I have their names. Can I on my way to Union City require them to take the oath or take them as prisoners of war? Unionists clamor for it and [it] would do much good.

W. W. LOWE,

Colonel, Commanding.

SANDWICH, June 6, 1862.

JAMES GORDON BENNETT, Esq., New York City.

SIR: The contents of this letter I wish you would forward to the Secretary of War if you think best. There is a scheme on foot here and on the other side of the irver between some Southern sympathizers and Marylanders to liberate the rebel prisoners on Johnson's Island. They have agreed upon a plan at last. Their first plan was to charter a steam craft, and the boat was actually fitted up for the purpose as far as running was concerned, she not having been in commission for some years. This plan was, however, abandoned on account of its being necessary to let crew in the secret and for the large expense the loss of the boat would entail upon the party, besides implicating the owner. Attention would be drawn more to a steamer entering the bay than a sail vessel, etc.

Their plan now is to purchase an old sail-vessel which one of their party is to own and which he is to say was stolen. This vessel is to be placed at some point in or near the River Detroit. One of the party disguised is to engaged a powerful tug to go for this vessel so as to arrive alongside after dark when a party from the vessel are to board the tug, make prisoners of the crew, take charge, tow the vessel to Sandusky Bay, surprise the guard, liberate the prisoners, who are to be informed beforehand if possible, place them on the vessel, tow her to Canada where they will be landed. This vessel will then be set adrift,

42 R R-SERIES II, VOL III