War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0653 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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privateersmen, not doubting that the hostages would be in readiness to be released with the privateersmen. It appears, however, that the rebel authorities request time to consider Major-General Huger's letter of the 3rd of May, 1862; this too after the bearer of the flag, Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple, had waited four days, not, however, without encouragement from General Huger that the release or exchange of the parties in question would take place.

I will forward immediately all the correspondence on the subject. I will wait until to-morrow before I leave for Baltimore in the hope that I may receive a dispatch from General Huger which will insure an exchange. If no letter is received where shall I send the privateersmen? Fort Delaware is recommended by General Dix. Please answer.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 6, 1862.

Major-General WOOL, Fort Monroe:

It the exchange of prisoners is not expected the privateersmen may be sent back to their former place of confinement.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, Miss., June 5, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Chase, Ohio.

SIR: You will parole a captain of General Price's army who wishes to exchange and send him to Corinth, Miss., to report to headquarters Department of the Mississippi to be exchanged for Captain Rabb, Second Indiana Artillery, taken prisoner at Weston, Mo., and paroled by Colonel Lewis, C. S. Army, or Missouri State Guard.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, June 6, 1862.

Colonel J. DIMICK, Fort Warren, Boston, Mass.:

It is represented that the cadets are made to empty the night buckets of the rebel prisoners. This must not be. Let it be done by the prisoners under a guard. Report in answer.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

JUNE 6, 1862.

Colonel TOWNSEND:

Release all medical officers of the Confederate Army unconditionally, with the understanding that we will the understandign that we will not regard medical officers a prisoners of war.

The prisoners taken from Jackson's army to be released on parole, man for man, for those released by Jackson. Some are in this city taken by Shields.

L. T[HOMAS].