War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0618 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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Major General John E. Wool, U. S. Army, is assigned to the command of the Middle Department and will proceed to Baltimore and assume the command thereof.

Major General John A. Dix, U. S. volunteers, will proceed immediately to Fort Monroe and assume command at that point reporting to Major-General McClellan for orders.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

[JUNE 1, 1862. - For action redressing the murder of Union soldiers at Houma, La., see Butler to Stanton, with inclosures, Series I, Vol. XV, p. 447 et seq.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, June 1, 1862.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The privateersmen arrived at 4 o'clock. They leave to-night for City Point. They are to be landed on condition that the hostages Corcoran, Willcox and others are delivered to the officer of the flag of truce.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, June 1, 1862.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Allow me to ask it as a favor not to send any prisoners for exchange until after the arrival of the privateersmen at this post. No exchange can be made until after the hostages and privateersmen are exchanged. Again, I have not boats nor officers to spare to be sending up daily to City Point when the object cannot be obtained.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, Va., June 1, 1862.

Major General B. HUGER, Commanding, Petersburg, Va.

GENERAL: I send on parole to be exchanged according to the cartel agreed upon between the United States and Great Britain in 1813 the privateersmen, prisoners of war, the names and rank of whom will be found in the rolls herewith transmitted,* viz, 2 captains, 3 first lieutenants, 2 second lieutenants, 1 midshipman, 2 pursers, 1 gunner, 1 carpenter, 1 sailmaker, 2 sailing masters, 1 steward and 69 seamen, in all 85, also 5 seamen taken from merchant vessels while attempting to run the blockade, all of whom will be delivered on your delivering to Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple, aide-de-camp and chief of my staff, the hostages remaining in confinement in the South on account of the said privateersmen now ready for delivery.

Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple goes in charge of the privateersmen and will communicate with you at the nearest approach to Petersburg, your

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* Omitted here; see Dimick to Thomas, p. 573, and Burke to Thomas, p. 611.

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