War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0615 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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of etiquette. But if they could there are but few among them who would consent to desert their families and their homes and the graves of their relatives in so awful a moment; they would bravely stand the sight of your shells rolling over the bones of those who were once dear to them and would deem that they died not ingloriously by the side of the tombs erected by their piety to the memory of departed relatives.

You are not satisfied with the peaceable possession of an undefenended city opposing no resistance to your guns because of its bearing its doom with some manliness and dignity, and you wish to humble and disgrace us by the performance of an act against which our nature rebels. This satisfaction you cannot expect to obtain at our hands. We will stand your bombardment unarmed and undefended as we are. The civilized world will consign to indelible infamy the heart that will conceive the deed and the hand that will dare to consummate it.

Respectfully,

JOHN T. MONROE,

Mayor.

[Inclosure D.]

MAYORALTY OF NEW ORLEANS,

City Hall, April 30, 1862.

To the COMMON COUNCIL.

GENTLEMEN: Since your last meeting events have occurred which will occupy a conspicuous place in the history of the country and of the age. It is needless for me more than briefly to recapitulate them. They are sufficiently well known from the publicity which has attended them and the reports of the public press.

It is enough for me to state that yesteray morning the answer you had agreed upon to Flag-Officer Farragut's demand of the day before was transmitted to him through the hands of my secretary, Mr. Baker, who was acompanied by Messrs. Soule and McClelland. The result of the interview of Mr. Baker with the U. S. commander was that the latter abandoned his purpose of bombarding the city and signified his intention of removing the flag from this building my means of his own force. Accordingly at 12 o'clock Captain Bell, accompanied by an escort of U. S. marines with two cannon, came to the City Hall and the flag was then taken down by the U. S. officers.

Thus the position assumed by New Orleans has been fully sustained. I am glad to say that the peace of the city has been preserved during the excitement of the last few days as far as was in my power to effect that object. The vilations of public order have been few in number and slight in character. This is owing to the valuable services rendered by the European Brigade, Paul Jugefils, general commanding, and the zeal and energy of the ordinary police force. It is still and will for some days be necessary to continue these efforts for the preservation of public tranquility, and I would therefore request you to authorize or suggest some arrangement by which the services of the European Brigade may be for the present retained. I have been compelled to increace the number of the police in order to meet the demands made upon me within the last few days, and such increase I am confident ought to be maintained. I hope you will make some provision for the excess of expenditure over the amount provided for in the budget thus demanded by the public necessities.

I would likewise suggest that such action as may seem expedient be taken for the relief of those of our population who are now in a suffering condition for want of the ordinary necessaries of life.

Respectfully,

JOHN T. MONROE,

Mayor.