War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0592 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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in writing nor to go beyond the limits you prescribe, and further that they will make no attempt directly or indirectly to escape.

You will limit the time during which they may be absent from the fort to not over three hours per day. You may permit them to write and receive letters subject to your inspection to see that they contain nothing which it would be improper for a good loyal citizen to write, and you may allow them to receive books and newspapers. These privileges will be withheld for any improper conduct on the part of the prisoners. Any money sent to them by their friends must be held in your hands subject to their checks for such purchases as they may make. Give them receipts for any money you may retain and keep their accounts in a book subject to my inspection.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

New York, May 24, 1862.

Colonel MARTIN BURKE,

Commanding Fort Hamilton, Long Island.

COLONEL: Arrangements have been made for the transportation of the privateer prisoners on the steamer Oriole, which vessel will be at Fort Hamilton (Gilson's Wharf) at 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. They should have three days' cooked rations and be in readiness at the time mentioned.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. D. TOMPKINS,

Assistant Quartermaster-General.

FORT HAMILTON, May 24, 1862.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS:

As all the troops are ordered off I cannot procure a guard and am unable to send the prisoners to Fort Monroe. I desire the order sending the thirty-six prisoners to Fort Lafayette from Fort Warren countermanded, as they will be I think too much crowded.

M. BURKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE APPOMATTOX,

Petersburg, Va., May 24, 1862.

Flag-Office L. M. GOLDSBOROUGH,

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22nd inst. The facts stated by you are correct; the officers and men were all armed and the men who captured them were pickets fromthis command, one of whose duties is to prevent any landing from your war vessels upon our shore. I inclose you a copy of my reply to Captain W. Smith.

The object of the visit was of course not know to the pickets; they only knew an armed enemy was on our soil. You state "the real object