War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0564 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

forced to take up arms against my beloved country, my wife and children, brothers and sisters, to my heart's sorrow. I was in Charleston and had got out of work and there was none to be got; no vessels to go where I could reach my home and not a cent to my name. I was compelled by necessity to do something. A man called where I was stopping; said he wanted to get a carpenter to work on board a ship; I told him that I would go; he told me to come with him and make a bargain with the captain. So I went with him. He took me aboard a schooner. No captain there. I told him that this was a privateer and did want nothing to do with such a vessel. They would not let me go off of her, so I had to stay and refused to do duty and they compelled me to. I knew it was against my God and my country, but was compelled to stay, and have been used pretty hard by them. Have been cheated out of all my money. They will do nothing for me, but call me a damned Yankee and had ought to die. there are several that would do for me if it was in their power. Since I have been in prison I have lost the only friend I had in this world. My wife died December 2 last and left two small children with my mother-in-law to take care of them; but their grandomother has sent them out to work-one at least. She writes to me for help. It is hard for to think that my children should have to toil for their bread when they have a father able to give them plenty; but in vain-I am a prisoner; I cannot help myself. Now, colonel, I ask you that I may be released on parole to return at any time when sent for so that I can help my family, or for you to permit me to get a few tools for to make a few ladies' fancy workboxes that I may get a few dollars to send my children to console and aid them, for they are very small. One has been sick more or less since her birth.

With respect,

HENRY F. RANDOLPH,

Beauregard Prisoner.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Corinth, Miss., May 21, 1862.

Major General O. M. MITCHEL,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Huntsville, Ala.

GENERAL: Your note of the 12th instant expressing a desire to effect an exchange of prisoners taken at Pulaski by Colonel John H. Morgan, C. S. Army, and paroled by him for those taken by you has been received. I accede to your proposition for an exchange of these prisoners. I have authorized Colonel John S. Scott or such other officer as he may send to repair forthwith to Decature in order of effect this object. In making this exchange I desire to arrange it on a basis adopted and published by Major-General McClellan for a general exchange of prisoners of war.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

[G. T. BEAUREGARD.]

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Corinth, Miss., May 21, 1862.

Major General O. M. MITCHEL,

Commanding U. S. Forces at Huntsville, Ala.

GENERAL: Lieutenant C. H. Morgan, C. S. Army, captured by the U. S. forces under your command at Huntsville on the 11th ultimo, was