War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0534 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

[Indorsement Numbers 2.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE, May 23, 1862.

Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War.

The only opportunity this department has had of sending clothing to prisoners of war has been through a flag of truce from Fort Monroe to Norfolk.

By order of the Secretary of War, January 20, 1862, 3,000 suits of clothing, 2,000 combs and 200 hair brushes were ordered from New York to Captain Tallmadge, assistant quartermaster, at Fort Monroe for distribution was made as to what particular prisoners were to receive them.

The Quartermaster-General has no knowledge of any money being sent for their relief.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Corinth, Miss., May 13, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding U. S. Forces, &c.

GENERAL: With this I shall send to your lines some sixty or more prisoners of war, private soldiers of your service recently captured, whom I directed to be released on their parole not to serve or bear arms during this was unless regularly exchanged. I have ordered certain other bands of prisoners also recently captured from places of confinement in the rear to be brought here and will release in the same way all who may give their parole. My aide-de-camp, Colonel Jacob Thompson, will bear this to your lines and deliver the prisoners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

[G. T. BEAUREGARD,]

General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 52.

Washington, May 14, 1862.

I. All officers absent onleave will proceed without delay to join their regiments except those on parole and thoe recently exchanged. Officers who are too sick to travel will immediately report the length of time they have been absent and forward to this office a medical description of their case by a medical officer of the Army or where that cannot be obtained by a competent physician.

II. The names of officers and men taken prisoners by the enemy must not be dropped from the muster-rolls, but will be placed at the foot of the list of names in their respective companies until they are exchanged or discharged.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 14, 1862.

Colonel J. DIMICK, U. S. Army,

Commanding, &c., Fort Warren, Boston, Mass.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs you to give assurances to Captain V. Sheliha and Captain S. F. Chipley, now prisoners of war at Fort