War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0511 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 2, 1862.

Major General B. HUGER, Commanding at Norfolk, Va.

GENERAL: I received your dispatch of the 30th ultimo yesterday in reply to mine of the 26th. It is scarcely necessary to recur to the causes which prevented an arrangement between myself and General Cobb for a general exchange of prisoners. I have only to remark that I have always been ready and willing to make the arrangements as I proposed to you on the 13th of February, 1862, as you will perceive by an examination of my letter to Brigadier-General Cobb dated February 27, 1862.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 2, 1862.

Major General B. HUGER, Commanding, Norfolk, Va.

GENERAL: I will receive the prisoners of was, 490, as mentioned in your communication of the 1st May,* on Monday next, the 5th instant, or any day you may name, at or near the light-house above Newport News.

In regard to those prisoners retained in the United States as privateersmen I have only to remark that they are held as prisoners of war and for exchange on the same terms as mentioned in my letter of the 13th of February, 1862.

I feel assured that there will be no difficulty in making all exchanges on fair and honorable terms as between you and myself. I will make a roll of all your officers prisoners in our possession and on parole as soon as practicable.

I am, very, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 2, 1862.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Near Hatteras, N. C.

GENERAL: I again congratulate you upon your great success against Macon. We are here preparing for coming events. We have a large fleet and at least 150,000 men. Major-General McClellan is at or near Yorktown preparing to shell out the rebels. I have no doubt he will succeeded.

I hope you will take care not to treat your prisoners with too much care and attention lest it may not be appreciated. I am in hopes, however, to be able to make arrangements to procure the exchange of our prisoners at Richmond.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN E. WOLL,

Major-General.

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* Not found.

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