War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0429 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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prisoners of war. Among the first and second classes there are some who stated they were forced by public opinion to take up arms, having voted against the ordinance of secession.

The quarters used as prisons are some of the huts built for soldiers, being inclosed by a board fence some fifteen feet high, along the top of which a platform has been constructed for the sentinels, running in some cases the entire length of the fence. The police of the quarters and inclosures was generally bad, but it was partly due to the rainy weather.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. JONES,

Assistant Inspector-General, U. S. Army.

BALTIMORE, April 6, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I learn from a person recently from Richmond that Colonel Corcoran is in solitary confinement, having been separated from other prisoners. The reason of his harsh treatment was not known. No one was allowed to see him, though his jailer said he complained bitterly of having been brought from South Carolina where he was treated kindly and confined again in Richmond where he had always been treated most brutally.

C. C. FULTON.

FORT MONROE, April 6, 1862.

Captain FOX, Assistant Secretary of the Navy:

* * * Richmond papers mention that two men named Price Lewis and John Sully have been convicted as spies and were to have been hung yesterday, but that a short respite had been granted. The men claim to be British subjects and loyal.

C. C. FULTON.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 36.

Washington, April 7, 1862.

* * * * *

XI. All officers and enlisted men or volunteers who are on parole not to serve against the rebels willbe considered on leave of absence until notified of their exchange or discharge. They will immediately report their address to the governors of their States who will be duly informed from this office as to their exchange or discharge.

* * * * *

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

NASHVILLE, April 7, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Arrests of several prominent persons who had been engaged in the rebellion have been made. They should be sent beyond the limits of Tennessee. Where shall they be sent? All is working better than could be expected.

ANDREW JOHNSON.