War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0424 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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recollection of the dangerous condition of very any of the patients at that time. I have had charge of the two hospitals established at this place, which are at least one mile apart, and at the same time had to prescribe for not less than sometimes fifty patients at the barracks, being unable to procure room in the hospital for all who really needed it. For the patients in both these hospitals as well as at the barracks I was compelled not only to prescribe but to put up the prescriptions myself, which I found exceedingly laborious, having neither apothecary nor assistant assigned me by the authorities. For my services I consider that I am justly entitled to $150 for the first month. For the time that I have charge of the hospital after the first month I will be satisfied to receive pay at the rate of $100 per month. Captain James A. Ekin, U. S. quartermaster, referred me to you as the proper officer to determine the amount of my salary. Please answer at your earliest convenience.

THO. CHESNUT,

Surgeon in Charge.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, Mo., April 4, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE THOM, Aide-de-Camp, &c., Saint Louis.

COLONEL: You will proceed to Columbus, Ohio, and remove all field and staff officers (except medical officers) prisoners of war to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, and deliver them to the commanding officer at that place. The quartermaster's department will supply you with funds to pay all expenses. Having performed this duty you will return to these headquarters at this place. You are authorized to call on the commanding officer at Columbus, Ohio, for a provost-guard such as you may deem necessary.

Respectfully yours, &c.,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, Va., April 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General BURNSIDE.

GENERAL: The rebels have resolved not to exchange any more prisoners except as it would appear on unfair terms. Although you paroled from near 2,700 prisoners they have refused - although they promised to do so - to exchange the prisoners confined at Salisbury, N. C. Twice they engaged to send them from Richmond, on two several days named by Brigadier-General Winder, and yet they failed to do so. The result has been that no more exchanges have been made since before the 22nd February.

I mention the fact in order that you may guard against similar treachery should you hereafter take prisoners.

I congratulate you on your gallant success at Beaufort.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.