War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0411 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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command should be admonished and removed and some one else placed in command.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

COLUMBIA, TENN., March 30, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I advise earnestly that no Kentucky prisoners be paroled unless upon sincere and absolute recantation of their treason. The quiet of that State depends upon it. I advise also that the parole of Major Cosby be revoked.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Cross Timber, March 30, 1862.

Captain N. H. McLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: Lieutenant Colonel B. Wood, of Tipton, has given several men papers to come after rebel dead and wounded. I require them to take the oath before I allow them to go through to the battle-ground. Should this be required before they start? Rebel parents ought to keep their sons at home. My scout visited saltpeter works. They are in Newton County, Ark. The hands mostly gone. I shall watch the occasion for taking. Three companies were leaving Newton County under orders for Pocahontas. They were not armed. All my officers and men taken by the enemy are coming for exchange. They will arrive to-day. They left Van Buren Wednesday evening. Price was there, but one brigade moved out, and the understanding was others were going with fifteen days' rations. I am trying to find their destination. Some artillery ammunition arrived and distributed. I am told Colonel Doubleday commands at Fort Scott. Colonel Deitzler has gone to Lawrence. Over a regiment of that Kansas force has been some days at Carthage, but they are not Deitzler's command and do not report to me.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, March 30, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

We are greatly annoyed by the laxity prevailing at Columbus, Ohio, in guarding rebels. Visitors avowedly disloyal are admitted. Many are out on parole with side-arms, talking secesh on the streets and in bar-rooms to the great detriment of our cause. We ask that it be stopped.

LAZ. NOBLE,

Adjutant-General of Indiana.

INDIANAPOLIS, March 30, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

The rigid rules excluding visitors from Camp Morton and hospitals of rebel prisoners has had an excellent effect. Have had no trouble. If adopted in other localities particularly at Columbus the interests of Government will be advanced.

JAS. A. EKIN,

Assistant Quartermaster.