War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0385 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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ings I intended erecting. To put on shingles will cost $179 and to rough ceiling will cost $50; the contractors estimate one building with shingle roof without ceiling at $800. If the shed huts are to be built shall it be done by the present contractors, by a new contract or by the quartermaster? The buildings I propose to erect for the major and surgeon, the hospital and additional barracks for the guard cannot well cost less and be suitable for the purpose. You will see by the description of them that they are roughly closed in and I have made very careful calculations to be sure that there is a very small margin for profits. Nothing has yet been done and I will wait for your instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Sandusky, Ohio, March 17, 1862.

Captain F. MYERS,

Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Columbus, Ohio.

CAPTAIN: It is probable General Halleck will order some of the prisoners from Camp Chase to this depot. They can come through on the Sandusky, Dayton and Cincinnati road without change of cars and the agent tells me he will bring them for less than any other road. He will also agree to land them here by 3 o'clock in the afternoon, which is an important consideration, and I hope you can arrange it so as to take this route. When orders are received please give me notice by telegraph and the number in order that arrangements may be made to cross them to the island.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SAINT LOUIS, March 18, 1862.

Adjt. General, A. C. FULLER, Springfield.

SIR: I think on the whole that the prisoners had better be left as they are and I will send the next installment to Chicago. I was under the impression that the Twelfth Illinois Cavalry had horses. We cannot for the present supply them. I think the Irish and Scotch regiments, 961 men, sufficient for guards at Chicago and that Colonel Cushman should take the field, where he is wanted just now more than he will be a month hence.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, March 18, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Douglas, Chicago:

You are authorized to exercise your discretion in permitting persons to visit prisoners of war. You will confine the permission to a very small number and to such only as go for benevolent purposes.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

25 R R-SERIES II, VOL III