War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0366 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

after learned he was sent to Washington, which too was without my authority. This is all I know at present in regard [to him]. I will immediately send for the provost-marshal and hear from him what further particulars there may be in the case and report accordingly.

WM. R. MONTGOMERY,

Brigadier-General.

FORT WARREN, Boston Harbor, March 10, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

SIR: I have to acknowledge yours of the 6th, received yesterday evening, directing Generals Buckner and Tilghman to be confined in separate apartments, and allow them no intercourse with any one, and to report that I have complied with the Secretary's orders. I presume the Secreatary's instructions forbid their writing to their families or receiving any letters. May I ask instructions relative to their writing or receiving letters?

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. DIMICK,

Colonel First Artillery, Commanding Post.

[Indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, April 22, 1862.

It is respectfully recommended that Generals Buckner and Tilghman be put on the same footing as other prisoners of war taken in arms against the United States and confined in Fort Warren.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, March 10, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel W. HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Sandusky, Ohio.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 3rd instant has been received. The erection of the cheapest shed huts that can be put up for the accommodation of more prisoners within the depot inclosure is authorized by the quartermaster-general.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Sandusky, Ohio, March 10, 1862.

Honorable O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

DEAR SIR: I picked up a Lafayette paper this morning containing two notices on matters in relation to the prisoners at that place, which I intended sending to you, but unfortunately the papers was torn and I can only send you a part of each. There is enough, however, to answer my purpose. The longest pieces is in relation to the interment of two or three dead prisoners, and there is plenty of it to show how shamefully the ceremony was conducted.

The short piece relates to "red tape" restrictions placed on the surgeon, and the tenor of it satisfied me that Doctor Chesnut is at the bot-