War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0355 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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FORT WARREN, Boston Harbor, March 6, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.

SIR: I have the honor to report the arrival of the following prisoners of war, viz, Generals Buckner and Tilghman on the night of the 3rd instant, and fifty field officers this morning.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. DIMICK,

Colonel First Artillery, Commanding Post.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, March 6, 1862.

Colonel J. DIMICK,

First Artillery, Commanding Fort Warren, Boston, Mass.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that the rebel generals Tilghman and Buckner be kept confined in separate apartments and allowed no intercourse with any one except by his special permission.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

SAINT LOUIS, March 6, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Columbus, Ohio:

Prisoners of war should not be permitted to leave their barracks nor permitted to carry their side-arms without special orders. There should also be exercised great restrictions in regard to the persons permitted to visit them.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Lafayette, Ind., March 6, 1862.

Honorable O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

DEAR SIR: I regret to say that Dr. Chesnut does not seem to be exactly fitted to have charge of a large hospital and if I could only believe part of what I hear he is certainly not competent to his position. The position is one that besides requiring professional skill demands much energy and decision in controlling men.

I am informed that Dr. B. F. Ingersoll, of this city, has the confidence of the most influential men of the place and I have little doubt if the hospital could be placed in his hands he would give entire satisfaction.

The pork house occupied by the prisoners is a very uncomfortable place and they must be removed from it as soon as the weather gets a little warmer, but in the meantime they will be knee deep in mud, and I have therefore referred it to the Quartermaster-General whether a camp should be inclosed for them here or whether they shall be sent to Camp Morton.

The expense will be about the same either way. It will gratify the people of this town if they were permitted to remain here.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.