War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0330 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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at least 3,000 spectators without the least interruption, and they were placed on board of the Ino which sailed last night.

I must add that the commander of the Ino, his junior officers and marines all acted their part bravely to sustain the honor of the American flag.

I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant,

JAMES DE LONG.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

CONSULATE OF THE UNITED STATES,

Tangier, February 20, 1862.

To the COMMANDER OF THE

U. S. STEAM SLOOP OF WAR TUSCARORA.

SIR: Having learned that two secessionists landed here yesterday form a merchant French steamer, Ville de Malaga, proceeding form Giblartar on their route to Cadiz, one of whom I am informed form undoubted authority is a lieutenant of the pirate Sumter, the other, Mr. Tunstall, has been acting as U. S. consul at Cadiz up to some time last summer, both of whom are commissioned to purchase coal at Cadiz to supply the Sumter by her captain-this state of facts being presented to me together with other reliable information in reference to the disloyalty of these men to the Federal Government incuded me to take necessary steps for their arrest which I have done, and they are now held as prisoners in the U. s. consulate at this place.

I now make the request that you come here at your earliest convenience possible so that I may delivered the said Tunstall and Lieutenant John Smith, allias H. Myers, into your custody to be conveyed by you to the United States on your return, adn on your arrival there to be placed by you under the proper authority of the Federal Government of the United States of American to be dealt with according to law, and this shall be your warrant for so doing.

Given under may hand and seal of the U. S. consulate at Tangier, MOrocco, Africa, the dya and yer above written.

JAMES DE LONG,

U. S. Consul.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

CONSULATE OF THE UNITED STATES,

Tangier, February 24, 1862.

To the COMMANDER OF THE TUSCARORA.

SIR: I have been expecting you daily since the 20th but suppose you cannot leave the Sumter. I have the united good will of the British minister and all the consular corps as well as the Moorish authorities. The first parties named are of course strictly neutral, but, at the same time I am very unpleasantly situated. My guards are all Moors and the prisoners have tried several times to bride them. First they offered them a valuable gold watch and $100 in gold. This is very tempting to semi-barbarians. They finally offered to secure to them $5,000 to assist them in making their escape. I had to put them in irons, and Mayers got a case knife and sawed off the rivets and got the irons off and jumped out of the second story of the consulate, but fortunately into the consulate lot. He then got over the wall inot the house of a Moor and was again arrested and taken back to his room and the number of guards increased.