War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0322 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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examination and comparison in order to secure a proper guard-boat for the use of the Sandusky depot, in accordance with the request contained in your letter of the 18th instant.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, February 25, 1862.

Captain J. A. EKIN,

Assistant Quartermaster of Volunteers, Indianapolis, Ind.

CAPTAIN: Your telegram of this date has been received. Lieutenant Colonel W. Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, has been directed to go to Indianapolis and make proper arrangements for prisoners of war. The regulations provide for their supplies. The Government will furnish from stock of inferior clothing in depots such clothing as is absolutely necessary to prevent real suffering upon proper requisition to this office.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 26, 1862.

Major General JOHN E. WOOL,

Commanding at Fort Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: Your objections to the proposition respecting the mode of discharding and paroling prisoners are approved.

The proposition is obnoxious in its terms and import and wholly inadmissible, and as the terms you were authorized to offer have not been accepted you will make no arrangement at present except for actual exchanges. But your arrangements may be made without reference to the instructions of the 18th instant in relation to the retention of Pillow and others which are revoked.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STATNTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 26, 1862.

Major General JOHN E. WOOL,

Commanding at Fort Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: There is a report that Buckner has been surrendered to the civil authorities in Kentucky. I have not yet been able to find where he is, but my orders are that he be treated as a prisoner of war. If he has been surrendered he will be immediately remander into military custody.

If Cobb should say anything on the subject you may tell him that he is regarded as a prisoners of war and should be treated as such.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.