War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0311 CORRESPONCENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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The principle of exchanging rebel officers captured by us and who had resiged from our Army has been recognized by the exchange of several officers-among others De Langel and Pegram-though in no instance done by me.

The exception made in yous of the 18th instant through General McClellan I have not yet broached to Generals Huger or Cobb lest it should embarrass negotiation and prevent the prisoners including hostages now in transmit for the North coming forward to these headquarters.

Am I to adhere in any event to the exceptions made in yours of the 18th instant? Repoy immediately by telegram and mail.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

P. S. -Copy of the above was sent to your be telegraph this morning.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, February 24, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Seventeen released officers and 345 privates have just arrived from Richmond and will be sent to Washington as soon as a train can be provided.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, February 24, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

The released prisoners are to leave at 1 o'clock in charge of Colonel Wood, who is ordered to report directly to your.

JOHN A. DIX.

Major-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, February 24, 1862.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Five trains of upward [of] 4,000 prisoners arrived safely and now comfortably quarter and guarded. Sixth train to stop at Terre Haute, where full preparations are made.

LAZ. NOBLE,

Adjutant-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, February 24, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The prisoners received and those to come will be all comfortably and safely quartered by to-morrow.

O. P. MORTON,

Government of Indiana.