War of the Rebellion: Serial 116 Page 0228 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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prisoners of like grade, conforming as far as practicable to your wishes as to the particular individuals to be so delivered in exchange.

I have the honor to be, with respect,

JAMES E. RAINS,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Somerset, Ky., February 5, 1862.

Respectfully forwarded. The above letter is in reply to Colonel Garrard's letter regarding the exchange of Humphrey Jackson and his three sons, Stephen, Abner and Henry, captured by the secession troops in their retreat from Rock Castle Hills.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

Fort Monroe, Va., January 30, 1862.

Captain BENJAMIN HUGER, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of Norfolk, Va.

CAPTAIN: Some time since Major-General Huger very kindly furnished Major-General Wool a list of prisoners of war at different points, omitting, however, the Richmond list. I have yet in hand a quantity of United States Government clothing which I desire to send to the Richmond prisoners as soon as I learn their number. I will thank you to send me the number now remaining at Richmond at your earliest convenience that their necessities may be supplied.

I should prefer to have a list of them if possible, although the number alone will suffice if the list cannot be had.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GRIER TALLMADGE,

Assistant Quartermaster.

[Indorsement.]

Received Norfolk January 30. Same day wrote General Winder for list and informed Captain Tallmadge thereof.

WHEELING, January 30, [1862].

Brigadier General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Commanding Department of West Virginia.

SIR: In reply to the communication addressed to you by a "Follower of the Cross" respecting the condition of the prison and its inmates under my charge I have to request that you appoint some one to examine its a their condition and report to you. Changes have been daily made to improve the appearance of the prisoners, and the only obstacle I have found in the way was their own disposition to

be filthy and neglect cleanliness. The prison has been completely whitewashed and every article furnished to keep it clean. The commissary department is well attended to. It is true the prisoners need clothing which Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard was directed some time ago to furnish them, as the "Followers of the Cross" did not carry out their benevolent designs to attend to it, though repeatedly furnished with lists of what was necessary.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH DARR, JR.,

Major and Provost-Marshal.