War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1439 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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Charles Clay. -Aged sixty-three. Born in Virginia; has lived in Raleigh County twelve years. Says he is a secessionist and on the Southern side. Has two sons in Floyd's brigade, in Captains Pate's or Adams' companies. Has done all in his power for the families of volunteers in the Southern army. Does not know of rwhat he is arrested. Says he went to hunt up some cattle and hogs driven by the wife of a volunteer into the mountains when the Northern troops went to Raleigh Court-House. Did not expect them to return so soon, but they met him in the road on his return home, took him prisoner, and compelled him to show them where they could cross the creek, and then discharged him. Says he never had anything to do with the Northern army or with the Union man, except in this instance. Says he has slept out in the mountains at night to avoid them. I examined Colonel Coleman, the member of the legislature of Virginia from Fayette [and] Raleigh, and Mr. McDonald, the member from Wyoming, and they neither knew enough of this man to say whether he was worthy of credit. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance.

Greenville Clay. -Son of Charles Clay; does not know for what he was arrested. Never had any connection with the Northern army or the Union men. Once met a a squad of Yankees on the road. They asked him the condition of the bridges and passed. He had nothing to do with the Northern army or the Union men. Has two brothers in the Southern army, one in Captain Adams', the other in Captain Pate's company, Floyd's brigade. In the spring put in a crop in partnership with one of his brothers. It was afterwards agreed one of them should volunteer. His brother being unmarried, volunteered in Captain Pate's company. Has aided the families of the Southern volunteers by cutting their grain in harvest, and by other labor. I have examined Colonel Coleman and Mr. McDonald. They can throw no light on this case. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance.

R. Clay. -A boy sixteen years of age, son of Charles Clay. Says he never had anything to do with the Northern army or with the Union men. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance.

George Caully. -Son-in-law of Charles Clay. Says he is a secessionist. Has a brother in Adams' company in Floyd's brigade. Takes care of both families. Has had nothing to do with the Northern army or the Union men. Colonel Coleman and Mr. McDonald have no other knowledge of this man than that he lives in this neghborhood. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance.

Jeremiah Combs. -Born in Raleigh County. Says he is a secessionist. Never had any connection with the Northern army or the Union men. No charge sent on with him that I have seen. Colonel Coleman and Mr. McDonald know he lived in Raleigh but can throw no light on his case. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance.

Maben Jackson. -Born in Orange County, Va. Joined the Virginia militia under General Beckley. Received information of the sickness of his wife and was permitted to go home. The permission signed by H. C. Richmore is herewith filed. * Says he was at home when the Yankees went to Raleigh Court-House. The militia were ordered to work on the roads. He remained at home working on the roads until

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*Not found.

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