War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1435 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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the Peipoint government. Believes the old government to be the true government of Virginia and is willing to support it as such. Is willing to take the oath of allegiance to the State of Virginia and the Confederate Government. Has never borne arms or been in any way connected with the U. S. Army. I recommend his discharge on taking the oath of allegiance. Witnesses examined, William L. Peters, M. Beekman, Mr. A. L. Wilson.

T. Moore. -Union man; voted against secession, but never voted for or sustained the Peirpoint organization. Had no connection or communication with the Federal army. Has been a quiet, peaceable citizen, desiring to be neutral; is willing to take the oath of allegiance to the State of Virginia and the Confederate States. I recommend his discharge on taking these oaths. William L. Peters, Lewis Beekman, A. L. Wilson, H. C. Poteet, witnesses examined.

H. Paine. -Arrested in Cabell; a quiet, peaceable citizen; Union man; never voted at the Peirpoint elections. His father's wagon was impressed by the Federal troops; he was sent along with it, and returned home with it. This compulsory service was the ony connection he ever had with the enemy, and regards the Government at Richmond as the true Government of Virginia. Is willing to adhere to it and support the secession cause. I recommend he be discharged on taking the oath of allegiance. Witnesses examined same as above.

Thomas Kyle. -Born in Frederick, Va. ; has lived several years in Cabell. Had no connection with the Federal army; never furnished them with supplies. Vosted for a member of the Wheeling congress and convention but is willing now to take the oath of allegiance. Two of his sons-in-law are in the Lincoln army. I am at a loss what to recommand here. The vote to sustain the western revolutionary government I consider treason against Virginia, and the State authorties ought to decide whether they will prosecute him for this act. Mr. Kyle is an old man seventy-two years of age. He is willing to take the oath of allegiance. So far as the Government of the Confederate States is concenred I think he ought not to be detained, but he should be turned over to the State of Virginia. Witnesses examined same as above. I ought to add that after the Yankees passed through Barboursville, it is proved that Kyle said Yankee bullets were the best pills for secessionists; that he took a musket to guard the court-house from secessionists, but Kyle says this was done on compulsion.

John Douthit. -Aged nineteen; has never been in the Federal army. Was a Union man in his sentiments. Refused to join the Union army; has never aided them. Is willing to take the oath of allegiance to the State of Virginia and to the Confederate States. I recommedn on doing so he be discharged. Same witnesses.

Dr. J. H. Rouse. -Born in Ohio; says he was in favor of the Union till Virginia seceded. Was willing to abide by her action and to remain neutral if he could. He is willing to take the oath of allegiance. Seems to have been arrested on account of rumors. He was communisioner of the United States and postmaster. From the testimony of the witnesses it appears that a young man living in Doctor Rouse's drug store went to Ohio to visit his father and brought over the mails without reference to the political sentiments of persons to whom the letters