War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1421 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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Third. The whole male population to be enrolled for military service; all stores and shops to be closed at 12 or 1 o'clock and the whole of the citizens forced to drill and undergo instructions.

Fourth. The citizens so enrolled to be armed with the arms given up and with those of infantry now in service at batteries.

Fifth. Send away as rapidly as can be done without exciting panic all women and children and reduce your population to such as can aid in defense.

Sixth. Give notice that all merchandise, cotton, tobacco, &c., not wanted for military use be sent away within the given time or it will be destroyed.

Seventh. Imprison all persons against whom there is well-grounded suspicion of disloyalty.

Eighth. Purchase all supplies in the district that can be made useful for your army, allowing none to be carried away that you might want in the event that the city is beleaguered.

In executing these orders you will of course use your own discretion so to act as to avoid creating panic as far as possible.

Your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

[For various proclamations and orders suspending civil jurisdiction and the writ of habeas corpus, see Series I, Vol. X, Part II, pp. 298, 402, 484, and Vol. XI, Part III, p. 386.]

NEW ORLEANS, LA., March 12, 1862.

JEFFERSON DAVIS, President:

In our opinion the writ of habeas corpus should be suspended immediately in New Orleans. We beg that you will declare martial law here at once, or authorize General Lovell to do so. Answer.

THOMAS O. MOORE,

Governor.

E. W. MOISE,

E. Judge.

M. LOVELL,

Major-General.

RICHMOND, VA., March 13, 1862.

Governor THOMAS O. MOORE,

New Orleans, La.:

You are requested to proclaim martial law in my name over the parishes of Orleans, Jefferson, Saint Bernard and Plaquemine.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

AUDITOR'S OFFICE, April 10, 1862.

S. S. BAXTER, Esq.

SIR: At your instance I commit to writing my knowledge of the remaining prisoners from Fairfax County who are to undergo an examination:

James O. Wren is a native of that county and has lived all his life in that and the ajoining counties, the most of the time in Fairfax. I have knonw him upward of twenty-five years. He is a very respectable man and a good citizen, free from difficulties and reliable. He voted