War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1350 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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but it left the impression on my mind that he was not to be trusted. I was talking to him; I said "the President" - meaning Mr. Davis. He did not understand me. "O, Mr. Davis. " "Yes," I replied, "President Davis. You have not yet gotten used to it. You know we have two Richmonds in the field. " His whole tenor and manner showed that the fat turkeys and baskets of grapes presented by those Boston abolitionists had won his heart in spite of his allegiance to the South. His falsehoods about his kind treatment to the prisoners will be proved some day. He ought to be placed under arrest for it as Henry ay was for his speech in Congress last summer.

All of my letters to you, so I have learned since I have been here were opened on both sides of the river before they reached you, and those that were not mutilated by being opened were resealed and forwarded. That is the reason why so few reached you. Did the ones with McC[lellan]'s plans as given to the military committee reach you? Mrs. Lincoln gave Wycoff the message you saw when they arrested him to make him tell.

Their successes have completely deranged them. All that I am afraid of is that success is so powerful even in the eyes of great men; and so strongly does force impose upon men that I am afraid our friends here will grow lukewarm and forget we are right. I have great hopes of you if McC. will give you fight. "Nous ne brulons que pour bruler les autres. " You ought to see the attitude they are now assuming toward England. After you are subjugated they are going to whip all Europe, send an immense army to Mexic, to Canada and allover the world.

E. P. Bryan is here; was arrested on the 22d. He tells me you are gone with your chief. * * * I have written reams. Cannot you possibly get me an answer? They arrested a woman in men's clothes and brought her here. She will not take them off. She is either a spy for them (for she is a Yankee woman) or it's been done to degrade us and deter every respectable woman from raising her voice in our cause.

[No. 3.] PRIVATE.] OLD CAPITOL PRISON, February 19, 1862.

Colonel B. T. JOHNSON, Present.

MY DEAR COLONEL JOHNSON: * * * "A military necessity" compelled McC. to arrest me two weeks ago. I have written reams. Cannot you possibly get me an answer? They arrested a woman in men's clothes and brought her here. She will not take them off. She is either a spy for them (for she is a Yankee woman) or it's been done to degrade us and deter every respectable woman from raising her voice in our cause.

[Numbers 3.]

PRIVATE.] OLD CAPITOL PRISON, February 19, 1862.

Colonel B. T. JOHNSON, Present.

MY DEAR COLONEL JOHNSON: * * * "A military necessity" compelled McC. to arrest me two weeks ago. I have excellent society, when I get a chance to enjoy it. It's solitary confinement; but trust to my French sagacity for that. Latude, the thirty years' prisoner in the Bastile, youknow never saw any one (?). Greenhow enjoys herself amazingly. My friends, or our friends, have supplied me with every comfort. I have no fault to find, but on the whole rather like it-out of the way of scandal! I cannot work so well here as when free. I regret that. Frank kicks against the door. "Let me out, you damn Yankee, you. " * * * Give it to Colonel Jordan. That's a good man, I love him very much. I thought old Bryan was here, but was agreeably disappointed to find it was only his cousin.

I now will write you what I desired to say. George Hanson tells me if you will send a power of attorney to any one your interest at all hazards shall be respected. The Union sentiment is dying out in F. Banks has your house. Also that Miss or Mrs. Robinson is making an effort to sell your house to foreclose a mortrage. You will understand what I mean. I am writing in great haste to give to the sentinel before