War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1267 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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COMMISSION RELATING TO STATE PRISONERS,

New York, April 9, 1862.

Colonel MARTIN BURKE, Fort Hamilton, N. Y.

COLONEL: The following prisoners, viz, David C. Wattles * * * having given their parole of honor to render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States, you may discharge them immediately.

Very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

[NEW YORK,] April 9, 1862.

I, David C. Wattles, of North Branch, Lapeer County, Mich., do hereby give my parole of honor that I will render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.

DAVID C. WATTLES.

Signed in presence of-

FORT HAMILTON, New York Harbor, April 10, 1862.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS,

Adjutatn-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that out of ten men sent before the commissioners in New York City day before yesterday four have been released, viz, David C. Wattles, * * * on parole of honor not to aid the enemy. * * *

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

Case of Fernando Wood.

MAYOR'S OFFICE, New York, November 27, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

DEAR SIR: An effort will be made to prejudice me in the estimation of the Government by representations affecting my support of the war movement, &c. This is designed to induce the administration to become a party actively hostile to my re-election as mayor, and to injure me before the people. I hope you will defend me against any such attempts in your quarter. I am for a vigorous prosecution of the war, for sustaining the Administration by every power at our command, and for a restoration of peace only when it can be done consistently with the safety, honor and unity of the entire Government.

Very truly, yours,

FERNANDO WOOD.