War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1207 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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An Act of the Confederate Congress, approved February 27, 1861.

The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact:

SECTION 1. That the commissioners authorized and directed to be sent to Great Britain, France and the European powers shall each of them receive a compensation at the rate of $1,000 per month, to commence from the time of their departure on their mission and to terminate on their return to this Government.

SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That a secretary shall accompany said commissioners who shall receive under like condition a compensation at the rate of $300 per month.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, August 28, 1861.

Honorable HOWELL COBB, President of the Congress.

SIR: I hereby nominate for the active and consent of the Congress the Honorable James M. Mason, of Virginia, to be commissioner to England, and the Honorable John Slidell, of Louisiana, to be commissioner to France.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE CONGRESS,

August 29, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you officially that on the 29th day of August instant (1861) the Congress did advise and consent to the nomination of James M. Mason, of Virginia, to be commissioner to England, and John Slidell, of Louisiana, to be commissioner to France.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. J. HOOPER,

Secretary of the Congress.

RICHMOND, August 29, 1861.

Honorable JOHN SLIDELL, New Orleans, La.:

You have been nominated and confirmed this day commissioner to France; Mr. Mason confirmed for England. The commissions are separate and distinct. When may we expect you? Telegraph me.

WM. M. BROWNE.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Richmond, September 23, 1861.

Honorable JAMES M. MASON, &c.

SIR: The President desires that you should proceed to London with as little delay as possible and place yourself as soon as you may be able to do so in communication with the Government. The events which have occurred since our commissioners had their first interview with Lord John Russell have placed our claims to recognition in a much stronger point of view; but in presenting the case once more to the British Government you ought again to explain the true position in which we appear before the world.

We are not to be viewed as revolted provinces or rebellious subjects seeking to overthrow the lawful authority of a common sovereign. Neither are we warring for rights of a doubtful character or such as are to be ascertained only by implication. On the contrary the Union from