War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1195 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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his retreat, when Lord Derby is expected to be summoned to take his place with the consent of all but the radical section of the people. This will be an era for the reconstruction of parties.

Such has been the programe down to the assembling of Parliament. What shape things will take afterward it is impossible to predict. That the American question is to be a serious element in any calculation of its action everything consprires to make us believe. I shall endeavor so far as it may be within my power to keep you informed of the movements as they occur.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, January 31, 1862.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington.

SIR: There is a good of feeling among the workingmen in this country on the subject of America and the treatment experienced by the Government of the United States at the hands of the leading newspapers. I have already received an official copy of the proccedings of one public meeting held in London, which being addressed only to me I have thought it sufficient to notice simply by a letter of acknowledgment.

This day I have received a visit from Mr. Beal who has placed in my hands a copy of the resolutions passed at another meeting in a different part of the town and herewith transmitted with a request that I would forward them. I told Mr. Beal that it wasnot the desire of the Government through me to attempt to influence the public opinion of Great Britain or its policy by any action whatsoever, but that I should cheerfully accede to his request to forward the resolutions to my Government as a simply expression of good will which I did not doubt would be received by it with the greatest pleasure.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS.

[Inclosure.]

9 CHARLES STREET, PORTMAN SQUARE,

January 29, 1862.

His Excellency THE AMERICAN MINISTER.

HONORABLE SIR: I have the honor to present you with the inclosed resolutions passed at a meeting of workingmen at the New Hall, Edgware road, on Monday evening, January 27, 1862.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

H. BEAL.

[Sub-inclosure.]

To the PRESIDENT AND MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT:

The following resolutions passed at a meeting of workingmen, held at the New Hall, Edgware road, on Monday evening, January 27, 1862:

That this meeting is of opinion that the rebel agents, Mason and Slidell, now on their way from America to England are utterly unworthy the moral sympathies of the working classes of this country inasmuch as they hold property in slaves and are theavowed agents of a tyrannical faction now in rebellion against the Republic in America, and are the sworn enemies against the social and political rights of the working classe of all countries.