War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1159 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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could not help her energetic reclamation against that proceeding; that the subject of the attitude of Spain in the case of war between the two powers had not been treated in the council of ministers as there had been no formal instance on my part in regard to the matter; but he quite agreed with me that the interest of Spain indicated a complete neutrality and there was no motive why Spain should take any part in the contest on either side.

His manner was frank and kind and his language such as to completely reassure me in my conviction that his country has no idea of being itself drawn into the dispute in any event. I did not myself think proper to give to this rather informal conversation any more important character nor attempt to press the minister to any district declaration of an official nature at the present moment. When we know the reply of the President to the pretensions of the English cabinet I shall endeavor to shape my course here in accordance with that our interests will then seem to demand, hoping to receive your instructions as to any positive step which it may be proper to take.

Meantime everything confirms the opinion * * * that a complete neutrality of Spain in any and all circumstances of the threatening conflict with England can be maintained.

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, sir, your obedient servant,

HORATIO J. PERRY.

WASHINGTON, December 30, 1861.

TO THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIV to Congress a correspondence* which has taken place between the Secretary of State and authorities of Great Britain and France on the subject of the recent removal of certain citizens of the United States from the British mail steamer Trent by order of Captain Wilkes, in command of the U. s. war steamer San Jacinto.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 30, 1861.]

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq.

SIR: Your dispatch bearing date of December 6 was duly received.

It treats chiefly of the Trent affair, and of the case of the British consul at Charleston. Those subjects having been for the present at least disposed of by this Government I need only now thank you for the diligence and sagacity you have practiced in conducing the proceedings concerning them so far as they fell within the province of your mission.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 30, 1861.

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq.

SIR: Your dispatch of December 12 has been received. White the information it furnished and the suggestions it present are highly appreciated the disposition of the Trent case which has been made seems to remove the necessity for reply.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

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* Omitted here. The correspondence transmitted is that which appears herein in its chronological order with other matter relating to the same subjece. -COMPILER.

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