War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 1067 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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Liverpool. He showed sense at least, but he has been a constant believer in the impossibility of reunion. He belongs to the old Tory party and is I think in intimate political intercourse with Derby and D'Israeli. I shall be curious to hear what he has to say a fortnight later.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 19, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Esq., Superintendent of Police, New York.

SIR: You may discontinue the surveillance over the correspondence of Messrs. Maury Bros., and say to them that this in done with the expectation that if any letters addressed to persons in the insurrectionary States come into their possession hereafter they will not attempt to forward them but will deliver them to you to be sent to this Department. Will you please return the inclosed letter to them?

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

OFFICE OF THE SUPT. OF THE METROPOLITAN POLICE,

New York, December 24, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: The letters returned from the Department addressed to Messrs. Maury Bros., not in each case having the postage paid, instead of handing over in person to their address I returned to Mr. Taylor, the postmaster, and yesterday called on Mr. Maury to communicate the contents of the letter of the Assistant Secretary of the 19th instant. He not being at home on my invitation has called on me this morning.

I stated to him the requirement made by the Department, viz, that it is expected of him to deliver over to the superintendent of the police any letters he may receive addressed to persons in the insurrectionary States. To this he dissents on the ground that he supposes no letters have been sent to him for persons in those States which were not purely of a commercial or family character, and which are not innocent of any design to interfere with the business of the Government. He desires instead of being required to deliver such letters to me that the condition will stand that he shall return them to the writers, informing them that he can send no letters to the South during the period of interdiction. He says that he has directed his brother in Liverpool to give notice to their correspondents in Europe that no letters for the South will be forwarded by them until it is legal to do so, and gives that as a instification for taking the ground he does. Your further instructions are requested.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN A. KENNEDY,

Superintendent.

OFFICE OF THE SUPT. OF THE METROPOLITAN POLICE,

New York, December 24, 1861.

F. W. SEWARD, Esq., Assistant Secretary of State.

SIR: Messrs. Maury Bros., not having as yet agreed to the conditions alluded to in yours of 9th instant I send you two letters* to their address received per America.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN A. KENNEDY,

Superintendent.

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* Omitted.

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