War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0979 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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any particular point in regard to this vessel which you desire to investigate, and if so I will he happy to look over the papers with reference to it and report to you the result.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. COFFEY,

U. S. Attorney.

Per J. HUBLEY ASHTON,

Assistant.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, February 19, 1862.

GEORGE A. COFFEY, Esq.,

U. S. District Attorney Philadelphia.

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 18th instant informing the Department of the impracticability of transmitting the original papers in the case of the prize vessel Salvor. In reply I have to state that copies will answer the purpose as well.

As you have kindly offered to do so I will thank you to examine the papers and report to the Department whether any proof appears among them to show that James McKay, of Tampa Bay, Fla., was the owner of the vessel or cargo, and also what the evidences are which go to show that the vessel itself was destined for one of the insurrectionary States.

I aSEWARD.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 8, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE,

Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor.

COLONEL: You may release Mr. Donald McKay, a prisoner confined in Fort Lafayette, upon his giving his written parole of honor that he will render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 12, 1862.

GEORGE A. COFFEY, Esq.,

U. S. District Attorney, Philadelphia.

SIR: Herewith I transmit for your information a copy of a parole which James McKay, the owner of the prize vessel M. S. Perry, or Salvor, has this day given. It is presumed that his testimony in the cause will be necessary to the proper administration of justice. If you should think so you may detain him on parole of honor for that purpose. It would be advisable it seems to me to take his testimony as soon as convenient. When you shall no longer need him you will please discharge him on his entering into an agreement in writing that he will render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.