War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0957 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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on condition that he would not take her into any port in the hands of the insurgents or perform any service for them. A short time after the Salvor arrived at Havana McKay disposed of her, as he claims, taking in payment notes and also power of attorney to sell and as master sail for Nassau, New Providence, with a cargo of contraband and other goods. As stated above the vessel was captured while attempting to run the blockade under English colors and taken to Philadelphia as a prize while McKay was sent to Key West and committed to Fort Taylor. The grand jury of the district court of the United States for the southern district of Florida-regular November term-returned an indictment for treason against James McKay "not a true bill. " By a letter of January 23, 1862, to the Secretary of State, from Major B. H. Hill, the Department of State was advised that McKay had been released from military custody and would proceed to Washington and report himself to the Secretary of State. McKay arrived in Washington about February 1, 1862, where he remained February 15, when in accordance with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

This man [Charles Butler] was mate of the steamer Salvor and was captured with that vessel while endeavoring to run the blockade near Tortugas October 14, 1861, by the U. S. steamer Keystone State. The Salvor was taken to Philadelphia by a prize crew and Butler was committed to Fort Lafayette. Butler claimed to be a subject of Denmark, and for the purpose of ascertaining the facts of his nationality he was by order of the Secretary of State released from Fort Lafayette January 8, 1862, and was placed in the custody of U. S. Marshal Murray, of New York.

William J. Browning, first engineer on board the steamer Salvor, was captured with that vessel while endeavoring to run the blockade about twenty miles south of Tortugas October 14, 1861 by the U. S. steamer Keystone State, Captain Scott commanding. The Salvor was taken to Philadelphia by a prize crew and Browning was transferred to Fort Lafayette. December 14, 1861, an order was issued from the Department of State to Lieutenant Colonel Martin Burke, commanding at Fort Lafayette, to release Browning on his taking the oath of allegiance, &c. He was accordingly released December 17, 1861.

George McNabb was assistant engineer of the steamer Salvor and was captured with that vessel while attempting to run the blockade about twenty miles south of Tortugas, October 14, 1861, by the U. S. steamer Keystone State. The Salvor was taken to Philadelphia by a prize crew and McNabb was committed to Fort Lafayette. He was released December 17, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance.

Donald McKay was captured from on board the steamer Salvor while attempting to run the blockade some twenty miles south of Tortugas by Captain Scott, commanding U. S. steamer Keystone State, on the 14th of October, 1861. McKay, a boy fifteen years of age, was the son of the owner and master of the Salvor, which vessel contained a cargo of contraband and other goods. He was brought to Philadelphia by a prize crew on board the Salvor and sent to Fort Lafayette where he remained February 15, 1862, when in accordance with an order from the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.