War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0887 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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until after the departure of these men. I think that a judicious use of the pardoning power upon the parties taking the oath will do much good.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

LOUISVILLE, October 2, 1861.

General ANDERSON:

DEAR SIR: Mr. Verneigerholz is a neighbor of mine who wishes to make inquiries about some men, Messrs. Griffith, Crow, Thurber, and McDowell, who have been arrested. Mr. V[erneigerholz] is a loyal citizens and he thinks a good effect would be produced in the neighborhood by liberating them on taking the oath of allegiance. I believe myself they would stay at home and behave themselves.

Yours, very respectfully,

NOBLE BUTLER.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

LOUISVILLE, KY., October 2, 1861.

General ROBERT ANDERSON, Louisville, Ky.

DEAR SIR: Joseph Griffith, F. M. Crow, Henry Thurber and A. McDowell have been arrested in Nelson County, Ky., as I understand making their way to the so-called Confederate Army. They started from Floydsburg, Oldham County, Ky., heretofore a community of disloyal citizens, upon whom a release of the prisoners would exert a good effect; besides I am confident their discharge from arrest upon taking a the oath of allegiance will make them good and loyal citizens. Messrs. E. D. Hobbs, J. B. O'Bannon and many other loyal citizens will vouch for the above statements.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. THEODORE VERNEIGERHOLZ.

I know of no more intolerant (I mean intolerance of a healthy kind) Union man than Mr. Verneigerholz and when he pleads for a secessionist there must be valuable reasons for it. Edward D. Hobbs and J. B. O'Bannon have both been urgent with me for the conditional release of the men named above and I cheerfully and cordially join in the request.

T. S. BELL.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Louisville, Ky., October 3, 1861.

Honorable SECRETARY OF STATE, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a petition for the release of certain state prisoners.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

LOUISVILLE, KY., October 2, 1861.

General ROBERT ANDERSON.

DEAR SIR: The undersigned, loyal Union men of Jefferson and Oldham Counties and of the city of Louisville, would respectfully petition