War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0780 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA, Baltimore, Md., September 28, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secreteary of State.

SIR: On the 19th instant you referred* to me the case of W. Wilkins Glenn, proprietor of the late Exchange newspaper in this city, with the letters* of Hon. M. Blair, Hon. Reverdy Johnson and H. W. Davis in favor of his release. Mr. Glenn's connection with the paper was purely financial. But after the arrest of Messrs. Wallis and Howard, the principal writers for its editorial columns, two very bad articles appeared - one misrepresenting the arrest made by the Government and the other setting it at defiance - and I directed Mr. Glenn to be taken into custody as the only responsible person who could be reached. The Exchange he has been discountinued and Mr. Glenn who is at Fort McHenry is sincere in his desire that it should not be revived as long as Messrs. Wallis and Howard are under arrest. A newspaper has taken its place without editorials but Mr. Glenn has no responsibility in regard to it. He has given repeated evidences of his earenst wish not to embarrass the Government in any way, and if released will I have no doubt occupy himself exclusively with the business of the large state which is in his charge.

Under all the circumstances I answer the query in your note indorsed on the papers referred to me: That it is expedient to release him on condition of his taking the oath of allegiance excluding all reservations and conditions.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, September 30, 1861.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, Baltimore, Md.

SIR: You will please discharge W. Wilkins Glenn on taking the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA, Baltimore, Md., October 7, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: Mr. Glenn declines taking any oath but is willing to give his parole of honor not to doany act against the authority of the Government, the supremacy of the Constitution or the execution of the laws of the United States; and he is willing to pledge himself further not to connect himself with any anti-Administration press until he is in a position to publish his opinions freely and unreservedly. The inclosed letter explains his views fully and I inclose it for your consideration not perceiving that it needs any suggestion from me.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

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*Not found.

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